I’m in the UK Illegally, What Should I Do?

Have you got a question?

If you are in the UK illegally there are options for you to either stay in the UK or make your way back to your home country safely.

If you wish to stay in the UK legally, you can apply for Leave to Remain. The application process for this can be stressful and complicated, therefore it is advised that you speak to a specialist Immigration Solicitor.

As you are already living in the UK illegally, your application will not be as straightforward as someone who is legally living here. This is why expert advice is of utmost importance, otherwise, you may make your current position worse.

What should I do first?

The first action that you should take is to speak with an immigration solicitor and tell them your situation.

This is confidential so you do not have to worry about authorities finding out about your situation.

The immigration team at Oracle Solicitors are highly experienced and have helped with a large number of applicants regularise their immigration status in the UK.

How can I stay in the UK legally?

Whether you can stay in the UK legally or not all depends on your circumstances.

Examples of circumstances where you can stay:

– Asylum seekers might be allowed to stay if they are in danger should they return to their home country.
– If you have dependent children in the UK.
– If you can prove your commitment to the UK when you were here legally.
– If you are aged between 18 and 24 and have lived more than half of your life in the UK.

The rules and requirements are complex and can often be daunting when applying to legally remain in the UK and that is why legal advice on the matter is of great importance.

What if I choose to stay in the UK illegally?

Staying in the UK as an illegal immigrant is a huge risk and it could throw your life into turmoil.

Why this is risky:

– You will not have the same rights as a British citizen: You can be denied health care, employers may exploit you and finding housing will be difficult.
– You can be detained and deported.
– You will constantly have the worry of being caught by authorities lingering over you.

The government have increasingly cracked down on illegal immigration and overstayers which is evident with the work of Border Police Force and internal Immigration Officers who carry out visits to properties and work establishments.

How can I leave the UK?

There are options available to you to assist you in leaving the UK.

The government can provide funds in some circumstances and our solicitors can advise if you are eligible for such funding.

You can also leave the UK voluntarily. To apply to leave voluntarily you will need to provide an address within the UK which you live at as well as an email address. Further information may be necessary and if it is not included, your application can be rejected.

Contact Oracle Solicitors for Expert Advice

Getting assistance with your application to regularise your immigration status or leave the UK is extremely important.

Contact out London or Belfast Immigration Solicitors today and we can advise you on your personal circumstances and ensure that your best interests are taken care of.

London: 020 3051 5060
Belfast: 028 9002 2371

Alessio Pellegrini

Alessio, with the Marketing team, strives to help colleagues excel with client care, while also keeping the firm ‘on the pulse’ regarding the most critical issues affecting our clients’ lives.

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